postgradlife

4 ex-students dealing with the real world

Posts tagged tas

I went to visit Jen in London a few weeks ago, and we staged the Ultimate Selfie.

These days, even more than the obsession millennials have with the selfie, is the obsession writers have about millennials and the selfie — together and separate.

Here’s a small roundup of bullshit/intriguing articles I’ve (for some reason?) seen in the past few weeks about millennials, selfies and why we are all unemployed/lazy/narcissistic/carefree/irresponsible/poor/validation-seeking/manic.
BBCNews blogs: Why can’t the selfie generation find jobs?”A study by the employment and recruiting company Adecco found that hiring managers are three times less likely to hire a millennial than a mature worker because they see older workers as more ‘reliable’ and ‘professional’.”
NYtimes: Millennials at Work: Young and Callow, Like Their Parents“‘You can find these complaints in ancient Greek literature, in the Bible,” said Peter Cappelli, “It reflects the way old people see young people’.”
TheFederalist: Millennials Unrooted: But For How Long?"Consider the mantras that they were bombarded with throughout their youth. Stay in school. Believe in yourself. Have safe sex, which of course meant sex without STDs, but also sex without babies. The emphasis for today’s new adults has always been on self-perfection."
CAN’T FORGET THESE ONES —PsychologyToday: #Selfies: Narcissism or Self-Exploration? 
or ibtimes: Selfies Linked to Narcissism, Addiction and Mental Illness, Say Scientists
or GuardianLibertyVoice: Selfies Cause Narcissism, Mental Illness, Addiction and Suicide? “‘Selfies frequently trigger perceptions of self-indulgence or attention-seeking social dependence that raises the damned-if-you-do and damned-if-you-don’t spectre of either narcissism or low self-esteem,’ said Pamela Rutledge in Psychology Today.”
interesting take from Feminspire: The Evolution of Selfie Culture: Self-Expression, Narcissism, or Objectification?  “What started as a University of Kansas fan’s down-blouse – or, in this case, down Jayhawks shirt — photo has spawned the creation of Twitter accounts, Facebook pages and newspaper articles cheering on college teams through cleavage.”
If I read one more story where someone breaks down the “history of the selfie…” WE KNOW ABOUT VAN GOGH, OK? AND WE KNOW REAL LIFE IS HARD.
-Tas

I went to visit Jen in London a few weeks ago, and we staged the Ultimate Selfie.

These days, even more than the obsession millennials have with the selfie, is the obsession writers have about millennials and the selfie — together and separate.

Here’s a small roundup of bullshit/intriguing articles I’ve (for some reason?) seen in the past few weeks about millennials, selfies and why we are all unemployed/lazy/narcissistic/carefree/irresponsible/poor/validation-seeking/manic.

  • TheFederalist: Millennials Unrooted: But For How Long?
    "Consider the mantras that they were bombarded with throughout their youth. Stay in school. Believe in yourself. Have safe sex, which of course meant sex without STDs, but also sex without babies. The emphasis for today’s new adults has always been on self-perfection."


If I read one more story where someone breaks down the “history of the selfie…” WE KNOW ABOUT VAN GOGH, OK? AND WE KNOW REAL LIFE IS HARD.

-Tas

via Buzzfeed
Maybe our palettes have expanded beyond pizza and ramen after leaving college, but that hasn’t made us any lazier about pgl cooking. 
As much as I loathe Buzzfeed, they’ve got some handy lists. And I’ve linked above the handiest of handy.
Almost as handy (but not as tasty)? 
This one: 34 Insanely Simple Two-Ingredient Recipes
Today I opened the fridge and realized I had three items.
Fresh yogurt, an expired (empty) container of yogurt and another expired container of yogurt.
When people asked me why I was moving back to Turkey my answer was almost always: “Cheap yogurt.”
Not kidding.
I asked my fellow pgl ladies what is the main ingredient of their daily lives —
Jen: pasta Malia: Annie’s mac n’ cheese CKB: Lean Cuisines (and vitamin supplements, good girl!)
 -Tas (yogurt)

via Buzzfeed

Maybe our palettes have expanded beyond pizza and ramen after leaving college, but that hasn’t made us any lazier about pgl cooking.

As much as I loathe Buzzfeed, they’ve got some handy lists. And I’ve linked above the handiest of handy.

Almost as handy (but not as tasty)?

This one: 34 Insanely Simple Two-Ingredient Recipes

Today I opened the fridge and realized I had three items.

Fresh yogurt, an expired (empty) container of yogurt and another expired container of yogurt.

When people asked me why I was moving back to Turkey my answer was almost always: “Cheap yogurt.”

Not kidding.

I asked my fellow pgl ladies what is the main ingredient of their daily lives —

Jen: pasta
Malia:
Annie’s mac n’ cheese
CKB:
Lean Cuisines (and vitamin supplements, good girl!)

 -Tas (yogurt)

Anonymous asked: Hi I was wondering if Tas could explain the Fulbright application experience. What do they look for in a candidate?

Hi!
Sorry for the (much?) delayed response. Here’s the lowdown:

There are two main types of Fulbright programs. The teaching program and the research program. The research program application is much more intense and involves a lot of pre-planning, a lot of dedication and a lot of research (obvi) on a really really good topic. You have to create contacts at a university in the country you want to be in and you have to have a well thought-out, fresh research proposal. The average applicant spends at least 9 months to one year preparing their application. Beyond that, I don’t know too much about the research application. My good friend Missy is a Fulbright Research Grantee, maybe consider sending her an ask over at her tumblr (which you should all check out anyway, she’s a painter and her work is beautiful).

As far as the teaching program application goes, though it’s less intense and has fewer requirements, it’s still a bit of a lengthy application process. I put my application together in one month, but my advisor was really skeptical about it until she saw how committed I was. You have to have a really solid statement of purpose and personal essay. Personally, I think these are what helped my application stand out. There were tons of people in my program who were much more experienced and well-rounded than me, but also the teachers in my program had incredibly varied profiles. Most had no teaching experience. As cliche as this is, I think the most important thing is to show your commitment to cross-cultural communication and really make sure your passion for the exchange of knowledge in whichever country you’re applying to really, really shines through. Really. Go to the scholarship office at your university/a university wherever you are living. They most likely have other grantees’ applications on file. Study them and see what strengths they have that apply to you. Get on the good side of the office’s scholarship advisor. S/he can be a big help, and often they are part of the judging process. Show you are open-minded, flexible, passionate. If you are a minority, talk about what kind of role this will play in you “representing the US” in a foreign country. If you are white, talk about the same thing, but stay far from anything white savior complex-y. Use your past experiences to describe your feelings and passions instead of just saying “I am passionate about xx.”

The most important thing is to show you have some kind of connection with the culture of the place you are trying to go. Join a conversation club or student group. In your interview, they will ask you what you are currently doing to get a grasp of that specific culture, not just what your plans are if you get the grant. Be specific about what fascinates you. Make them think that even if you don’t get the grant, you are going to do this project/live in this country.

Also, good grades, strong leadership in some extracurriculars and STELLAR recommendations are a given.

Good luck!
Tas

Hello dear followers,

It’s been a long time since you and I last spoke. That is, it’s been a long time since I’ve made myself sit down and write something.

I have a lot of excuses and reasons and apologies. But I’ll skip all that and confess something to all of you.

Take heart, the postgradlife can be good.

That feeling that you don’t know where you’re going, that you’re making the wrong choices, that you’re not working hard enough, that you’re not making enough money, that you’re not any wiser or more responsible or more experienced, or more put together, or healthier, or more in control, those feelings don’t go away.
Existential-crisis Wednesdays are still a thing.
You still waste endless hours on Facebook, comparing your life to others who seem more successful, happier, prettier, more put together, more in love, more #blessed.

And other people do the same, looking at your Facebook photos, reading your tumblr posts (if you update, that is), scrolling through your Instagram feed, rolling their eyes at your painstakingly composed tweets, listening to your overly bright stories as you catch up over brunch.

But suddenly, the weekend is an even more magical thing. Maybe you have the kind of job that lets you walk out of the office and leave work totally behind. Maybe you live next to a street teeming with breakfast cafes. Maybe you’re in a new city, with hidden secrets waiting for you to explore. Maybe you’re in your hometown, learning that your parents can be your best friends. Maybe your bffls live next door instead of oceans away. Maybe you’re more confident, or more financially stable, surrounded by people who love you, more self-sufficient, less functionally fixed, or not as anxious, sexier, able to wake up at a decent hour. Maybe you have a better wardrobe. Or maybe you are finally comfortable. Comfortable staying in. Comfortable in your job. Comfortable in your relationship. Comfortable going to a coffee shop and chatting with the barista instead of keeping your headphones in and avoiding eye contact.

Comfortable with the fact that maybe you’re not actually comfortable and don’t know that you’ll ever be.  Comfortable with the knowledge that you’ll always want more, because, well, that’s not postgradlife, that’s life. But comfortable enough to smile at what you have now.

I’ve still got my smile, y’all!

Looking forward to posting more. Keep me on task, friends :)

-Tas

 

15 Things That Are Still Good to Eat After They Expire

Nope, not an update on our lives or anything, but some NEED TO KNOW information. Click the link for details on how long past expiration/sell by dates to use these things.

I’m always having a struggle with the milk and yogurt in my fridge.

-Tas

Kabatepe, Çanakkale
So, one of the major bummers about living abroad is that you don’t get to spend holidays with your family, unless you’ve been saving up money and vacation time. 
Cause that’s the crap part about having an adult-person job. No summer. Since I was a teacher last year, this is the first one I’ve spent since 1994 without a summer break. I don’t know why adults have no pity for the recently graduated, when they totally went through the same thing. For 16 years I’ve been able to take a nice two-month break from “normal life.” That doesn’t mean I spent my summers doing nothing — it just meant I spent my summers doing something different. But now I see an endless stretch of “job.”
Luckily, I like mine.
Since I couldn’t visit the fam, I took as much advantage of my “Summer Break” as possible  and spent a very happy Eid holiday camping on the beach, exploring Çanakkale with a friend, swimming and walking and ferrying and eating sausage by a fire and all that great stuff of summer.
Here’s something you may not have known: Troy, as in the Trojan War’s Troy (or Brad Pitt’s, depending on who you are), is in Çanakkale, Turkey, not Greece. 
Bayraminiz Kutlu Olsun to you, Turkey. And a Happy Eid to the rest of ya!
-Tas

Kabatepe, Çanakkale

So, one of the major bummers about living abroad is that you don’t get to spend holidays with your family, unless you’ve been saving up money and vacation time.

Cause that’s the crap part about having an adult-person job. No summer. Since I was a teacher last year, this is the first one I’ve spent since 1994 without a summer break. I don’t know why adults have no pity for the recently graduated, when they totally went through the same thing. For 16 years I’ve been able to take a nice two-month break from “normal life.” That doesn’t mean I spent my summers doing nothing — it just meant I spent my summers doing something different. But now I see an endless stretch of “job.”

Luckily, I like mine.

Since I couldn’t visit the fam, I took as much advantage of my “Summer Break” as possible  and spent a very happy Eid holiday camping on the beach, exploring Çanakkale with a friend, swimming and walking and ferrying and eating sausage by a fire and all that great stuff of summer.

Here’s something you may not have known: Troy, as in the Trojan War’s Troy (or Brad Pitt’s, depending on who you are), is in Çanakkale, Turkey, not Greece. 

Bayraminiz Kutlu Olsun to you, Turkey. And a Happy Eid to the rest of ya!

-Tas

How strong and foolish is man. He loses his health in gaining wealth, then to gain health he wastes his wealth. He ruins the present while worrying about the future, but weeps in the future by recalling his past…

Ali ibn-Abu Talib

My mom posted this on her Facebook page today. I wonder if she looks at the lectures she and my dad have been giving me about my future and finds this at all ironic.

Parents do the darndest things!

-Tas

Sunsets are always gorgeous, always a private, personal moment. Whether you’re soaking in the last of the peach and primrose rays sitting on the sands of Folly Beach or standing on the rooftop of a NYC skyscraper, surrounded by twinkle lights and wine-wielding partygoers. 

This one found me on a ferry boat, crossing from Europe to Asia on Istanbul’s Bosporus Strait. That’s the Golden Horn silhouetted against the sky. I finally understand why they call it that.

Sunsets are always special. Whether you’re watching one on the first night of your honeymoon with the person you’ll spend the rest of your life with or driving home from an unforgettable road trip with your best friends from college.

This one was at the very start of Ramadan. My first in Turkey. I was on my way to a special iftar (fast-breaking dinner) with my closest friends when I stepped onto the back deck of the boat to find this breathtaking sight waiting for me.

Sunsets are always magical. Whether they fill you, just for a moment, with that incredible sense of serenity, that all is right with your life, or remind you that there is real beauty in the world and that you’ve definitely seen a part of it, so stop worrying that you’re missing out. 

This one…well, it’s only a picture but I think you can see the magic of this one.

Ramadan Mubarak y’all.

-Tas
(photo taken by my new friend Elena, Istanbul, Turkey, ferry to Kadikoy)

Sunsets are always gorgeous, always a private, personal moment. Whether you’re soaking in the last of the peach and primrose rays sitting on the sands of Folly Beach or standing on the rooftop of a NYC skyscraper, surrounded by twinkle lights and wine-wielding partygoers.

This one found me on a ferry boat, crossing from Europe to Asia on Istanbul’s Bosporus Strait. That’s the Golden Horn silhouetted against the sky. I finally understand why they call it that.

Sunsets are always special. Whether you’re watching one on the first night of your honeymoon with the person you’ll spend the rest of your life with or driving home from an unforgettable road trip with your best friends from college.

This one was at the very start of Ramadan. My first in Turkey. I was on my way to a special iftar (fast-breaking dinner) with my closest friends when I stepped onto the back deck of the boat to find this breathtaking sight waiting for me.

Sunsets are always magical. Whether they fill you, just for a moment, with that incredible sense of serenity, that all is right with your life, or remind you that there is real beauty in the world and that you’ve definitely seen a part of it, so stop worrying that you’re missing out.

This one…well, it’s only a picture but I think you can see the magic of this one.

Ramadan Mubarak y’all.

-Tas

(photo taken by my new friend Elena, Istanbul, Turkey, ferry to Kadikoy)

you know you are in grad school when you are falling asleep in a lecture and to stay awake you start reading a software manual.

—Monica, fellow pgl’er and friend.

fotojournalismus:

Istanbul | June 30, 2013

1. Participants wave a huge rainbow flag during a gay pride parade in central Istanbul on June 30, 2013. Tens of thousands of anti-government protesters teamed up with a planned gay pride march in Istanbul. Crowds were stopped by riot police from entering Taksim, the centre of previous protests, but the atmosphere appeared peaceful. (Osman Orsal/Reuters)

2. People march during a gay pride parade in central Istanbul June 30, 2013. (Umit Bektas/Reuters)

3. People march and chant slogans during a gay parade on Istiklal Street, the main shopping corridor on June 30, 2013 in Istanbul. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

4. A woman shows a bra made from a gas mask during during a gay parade on Istiklal Street on June 30, 2013 in Istanbul. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

5. People march and chant slogans during a gay parade on June 30, 2013 in Istanbul. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

6. Participants hold rainbow flags during a gay pride parade in central Istanbul June 30, 2013. (Umit Bektas/Reuters)

7. A participant holds a rainbow flag during a gay pride parade in central Istanbul June 30, 2013. (Osman Orsal/Reuters)

8. People, wearing Guy Fawkes masks, pose during a gay parade on June 30, 2013 in Istanbul. (Gurcan Ozturk/AFP/Getty Images)

9. Participants attend a gay pride parade in central Istanbul June 30, 2013. (Umit Bektas/Reuters)

10. People and activists hold a giant rainbow flag as they shout slogans on Istiklal Street, Istanbul’s main shopping corridor on June 30, 2013. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

I know I’ve been pretty quiet about both what’s going on here in Turkey and what’s going on in my life. But here’s the No. 1 reason why: Game of freaking Thrones. I must finish reading these books.

Enjoy these photos of the Pride Fest in Istanbul, though. I sure did. Her yer Taksim!

Also, I’m having a mini-getaway this week. Updates to come.

-Tas